The Hidden Benefits of Dandelion Tea

What typically comes to mind when thinking of dandelions are the little yellow-flowered weeds which seem to grow sometimes in the unlikeliest of places. The benefits of dandelion tea however, are as surprising as finding the plant is edible to begin with. Dandelion flowers, leaves, and roots are all edible, and it is generally considered safe in food and medicine. The circumstances you will want to be careful about are with allergies to ragweed, marigold, chamomile, chrysanthemum, yarrow, or daisy, and anyone pregnant, nursing, or taking prescription drugs should talk to a health care professional before adding something new to their diet.

Dandelion or Taraxacum officinale, has been consumed historically for thousands of years to treat anemia, skin problems, scurvy, blood disorders, and depression. Native Americans used dandelion tea to treat kidney disease, swelling, skin problems, heartburn, and upset stomach. Chinese medicine has used dandelion to treat stomach problems, appendicitis, and breast problems, such as inflammation or lack of milk flow.

Dandelion tea has been shown to improve liver function by removing toxins and reestablishing electrolyte balance. Addicts in recovery sometimes don’t fully realize the physical damage that drug and alcohol abuse exerts on the body and most particularly the liver and brain functioning. It’s rich with vitamins A, B, C, and D, as well as minerals such as potassium, iron, zinc, and has more protein per serving than spinach.

Nearly everything we consume directly or indirectly affects the brain, and some things have more positive effects than others. Restoring physical health through good nutrition is a great way to lay the foundation for continuing recovery. It’s well documented that with proper nutrition and a healthy body, our thinking and outlook improve.

When we feel good, and have a great outlook about our life, the tendency to seek escape through drugs and alcohol lessen. Understanding the benefits of dandelion tea is part of a larger awareness of nutrition and the ways in which an individual can take a proactive and informed approach to their well-being.

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About the Reviewer: Chris Barnes

Chris BarnesChristopher Barnes has worked in health care for over thirty years. He is a graduate of Alabama State University where he earned a double Bachelor of Science Degree in Social Work and Psychology in 1982. Christopher Barnes is currently the Director of Clinical services at The Discovery House where he has been employed for the past five years. Because of his extensive experience in health care & substance abuse he has an excellent rapport with constituents, clients, and other professional organizations in the counseling/social service community.

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