adderall abuse

Adderall Addiction: What to Look for and How to Treat It

Adderall is commonly prescribed to help people with ADHD. When people who suffer from the disorder take the drug, it can help them to concentrate better and it can also give them a longer attention span.

Despite the legitimate uses for Adderall, it can very easily be abused. In fact, street dealers contribute greatly to Adderall abuse. So what exactly is this drug?

What Is Adderall?

Adderall is a blend of amphetamine and dextroamphetamine. Both of these drugs act on the central nervous system and boost the number of certain chemicals in the brain. For people with ADHD, this helps them to focus more on a single task to a much greater degree than they would normally.

Adderall gives you an incredible amount of energy; this is why you often hear of college students using it to study. When it’s abused, Adderall can have seriously negative effects on both your mental and physical health.

Don’t be fooled into thinking Adderall is safe just because it’s a pharmaceutical drug. Adderall abuse is just as serious as addiction to other forms of street drugs.

If you’re prescribed Adderall by a doctor, always take the recommended dose. When you exceed the prescribed dosage, you may experience bad side effects.

Adderall Addiction

When you take Adderall for a long time, it can lead to addiction, especially if you’re abusing the drug and not using it as directed by a doctor. While Adderall can give you a huge energy boost, it’ll become less effective if you abuse it.

When you have a serious Adderall addiction, you’ll be taking it just to function normally. Without it, you’ll become lethargic, anxious, and depressed.

Sometimes, Adderall addiction can sneak up on people; many might that think since it’s a pharmaceutical drug, it’s completely safe. But it actually contains amphetamine, which is in itself an illegal street drug.

The effects of Adderall are also somewhat similar to methamphetamine, although methamphetamine is much stronger. If you abuse Adderall and take too much, you can easily become addicted.

How to Spot Adderall Abuse

There are many obvious signs you can look out for to see if someone is abusing Adderall. Someone who’s under the influence of the drug might have dilated pupils and they might also be clenching their jaw a lot (bruxism).

If someone is abusing Adderall, you may also notice dramatic changes in their personality. For example, they might be a lot more outgoing and talkative. This is especially noticeable in people who are usually more introverted.

People who are addicted to Adderall will probably exhibit extreme personality changes, depending on when they last took the drug. When it’s in their system, they may speak quickly and have an excessive amount of energy. When the effects of the drug wear off, they may become anxious and easily agitated.

If you notice someone taking a pill and then within half an hour, their personality changes completely, this could indicate they’re abusing a drug such as Adderall.

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A lot of people who have problems with Adderall didn’t start using it recreationally. Often, college students might use it to help them study for a test or to submit an essay on time. Sometimes, Adderall use continues and develops into a problem.

Note that Adderall has fairly similar effects to a range of other drugs. The symptoms described here could also apply to someone who’s abusing drugs like cocaine or MDMA.

How to Treat Adderall Addiction

If you or a loved one is suffering from Adderall addiction, it’d be wise to seek treatment as soon as possible. Adderall addiction can be difficult to overcome since there might be some unpleasant side effects.

The drug gives you energy and makes you feel good by boosting the number of certain chemicals in the brain. When you stop using Adderall, your brain will be in short supply of these essential “feel good” chemicals.

After a few days or so, your brain chemistry will start to return to normal. However, getting through these few days can prove to be difficult. Many people opt to start using again rather than face the unpleasant side effects of Adderall withdrawal.

So what can you do to maximize your chances of recovery? Attending rehab at an inpatient facility is by far the best way to get off Adderall.

When you get treatment at an inpatient facility, you actually live at the rehab center. This means you’ll always have access to the care you need.

Doctors might prescribe certain medications to help you with some of the more unpleasant withdrawal effects. They’ll also be able to monitor your recovery and make the necessary adjustments to that medication.

Commit to Recovery

The great thing about withdrawing from Adderall in an inpatient facility is that you have the freedom to dedicate all of your time and energy to recover.

When you separate yourself from the stresses of everyday life, the chance of you being able to get clean goes up significantly. Not only are you away from problems that might trigger you to use Adderall again, but you’re also separated from people who might be a negative influence on you.

In addition to treating your addiction, an inpatient rehab facility will also help you to address any psychological issues you might have. Generally, those who are addicted to a substance have some kind of underlying psychological issues that aren’t being addressed. Only by treating these issues alongside the addiction can you hope to definitively recover.

Take the First Step to Get Better

Taking the first step is often the hardest part of tackling any kind of addiction. Most people find that once they actually start taking part in an inpatient rehab program, things get a lot easier. This is because of the excellent, round-the-clock care that only inpatient rehab can provide.

If you or a loved one is facing Adderall abuse, consider turning your life around. Contact an inpatient rehab center and talk to them about your situation.

Get in touch with us now to speak to us about inpatient rehab.

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About the Reviewer: Chris Barnes

Chris BarnesChristopher Barnes has worked in health care for over thirty years. He is a graduate of Alabama State University where he earned a double Bachelor of Science Degree in Social Work and Psychology in 1982. Christopher Barnes is currently the Director of Clinical services at The Discovery House where he has been employed for the past five years. Because of his extensive experience in health care & substance abuse he has an excellent rapport with constituents, clients, and other professional organizations in the counseling/social service community.