Xanax Addiction

A Complete Guide To Xanax Addiction

The Xanax Statistics

One of the worst drug addictions in the United States is Xanax. This is a drug prescribed for relieving panic and anxiety disorders. Xanax is frequently misused because of the tranquil and calming high provided by the drug. If you are addicted to Xanax or know someone who is, you need to get help before the addiction becomes any worse. There are trained and experienced medical experts available who understand how hard it is to live once you become addicted to Xanax. There are rehabilitation programs available who will treat your medical disorders while providing the help you need for your addiction.

Xanax Addiction
Xanax Addiction

During the 1970s, Xanax received approval for treating panic disorders. Xanax is useful for treating numerous health issues, including nausea resulting from depression and chemotherapy. Xanax is a benzodiazepine medication that makes dramatic changes in the brain quickly. This drug has become one of the most addictive benzodiazepine medications currently available. If the individual is using a dose of four milligrams per day for more than three months, the risk of addiction is extremely high. The same risk applies to anyone abusing this drug.

Xanax is classified as a Schedule IV substance. This means the abuse potential is supposed to below. The evidence has shown thousands of people are looking for treatment because of their dependence on Xanax. Treatment facilities admitted 17,019 individuals in 2012 for drug abuse. The primary drugs were benzodiazepines, including Xanax. This type of drug is one of the most highly addictive medications available on the market. An addiction can form in just a few weeks. When benzodiazepines are taken every day for six weeks, one out of every four users will become dependent on the drug.

The Signs of Addiction

The characterization of addiction is a physical and psychological dependence on a drug. Withdrawal has an impact on both the body and the mind. Benzodiazepines need to be decreased slowly to manage the withdrawal. There must be a schedule to reduce the dosage at a predetermined rate. To make sure the individual is safe; this must be done through medical detoxification. The additional signs of Xanax addiction include:

  • The desire to stop taking Xanax combined with the inability to stop
  • Developing an obsession to acquire and use Xanax
  • Using Xanax despite the fact it is triggering personal difficulties
  • Taking risks while using Xanax such as driving
  • Losing control over how much Xanax is being taken
  • Losing interest in once enjoyable activities
  • Legal issues resulting from the use of the drug

When the addiction becomes severe, the individual may crush and snort Xanax to increase the speed of their results. A good indication the drug is being abused is paraphernalia equipment. This includes razor blades, credit cards, and a mortar and pestle. The signs the individual is snorting Xanax include straws, papers, and rolled up dollar bills. A lot of empty Xanax bottle is highly suspicious. Addiction means the individual will always be searching for more Xanax because their prescription will no longer be enough. This often results in a severe decrease in finances.

The individual will begin to ask their family and friends for money without offering any explanation. Cash or valuable items will be missing from the homes the individual has visited to pay for their drug addiction. One of the most severe indications of Xanax abuse is legal difficulties. Once the addiction requires legal representation for a matter related to Xanax, the individual is not using the drug casually. It is essential to understand reselling or redistributing any prescription medication to another person is against the law. The consequences are very similar to selling illegal drugs, including cocaine or heroin.

The individual caught selling Xanax faces significant time in jail and extremely high fees. If the individual who purchased the drug is seriously injured or dies, the dealer can be sentenced to life in prison for their actions. Even if the individual is taking Xanax for a medical condition, they can still become dependent on the drug. Their tolerance level will start to decrease. This means the Xanax will no longer work the way it was intended. Individuals with an anxiety disorder will have their symptoms return and may increase their dosage to help eliminate their symptoms. Eventually, the brain will need the drug to maintain a sense of normalcy.

The Mental Implications of Addiction

Once the individual develops a Xanax addiction, all they will be able to think about is the drug. Trying to detox alone carries significant health risks. Professional intervention is necessary to keep the individual safe and help prevent them from taking more Xanax. Once the person has a compulsion to use Xanax, the chances of them safely discontinuing the drug are incredibly slim. Withdrawal has a mental impact on the brain. The mind becomes used to having the drug. This can cause periods of depression, irritability, insomnia, and paranoia if the individual does not have medical supervision. Medical detox can treat the symptoms of withdrawal safely while keeping the individual relatively comfortable during detoxification.

The Physical Implications of Addiction

When a person becomes physically addicted to Xanax, there will be symptoms of physical withdrawal when the individual stops using the drug. The most common side effects include nausea, profuse sweating, convulsions, headaches, vomiting, and blurry vision. As time passes, the person’s body will become used to the drug. When the individual stops taking Xanax, their body needs to process out the drug. This can cause the person to feel aches all over their body. Over-the-counter pain medications can help relieve this discomfort. A lot of people end up in the emergency room when they attempt to detoxify without medical assistance. Last year, emergency rooms in the United States treated 44,796 individuals for benzodiazepine medication abuse, including Xanax.

The Impact of Xanax on Modern Culture

Xanax has had an impact on modern culture in the United States. There are now numerous street names being used for Xanax. This includes:

  • Benzos
  • Blue footballs
  • Xannies
  • Planks
  • Zanbars
  • Yellow boys
  • School Bus
  • Bars
  • White girls
  • Bricks
  • Handlebars
  • White boys
  • Upjohn
  • Z-Bars
  • Bicycle parts

Xanax has appeared in pop culture, including movie references and song lyrics. Unfortunately, Xanax has been linked to the death of several celebrities including Heath Ledger, Whitney Houston and Michael Jackson. Although there are individuals with a physicians prescription for Xanax, the most common action is buying the drug from a person with a prescription. This individual is referred to as an intermediary. In some instances, they do have a prescription. Sometimes they have a pharmaceutical supplier. In either case, they sell the Xanax for a high price.

The Red Flags of Addiction

Certain red flags will let you know there is active addiction. This includes:

  • Developing a tolerance leading to an increased dosage
  • Constant worry over the supply of Xanax and always thinking about using the drug
  • The inability to control when the drug is used or the dosage
  • Using Xanax whenever there are symptoms of withdrawal
  • Using Xanax despite the conflict
  • Avoiding spending time with friends and attending family functions

Everyone can become dependent on a drug. Specific demographics are more likely to use drugs than others. More women have an addiction to benzodiazepines than men. There is a possibility this is because a physician is more likely to prescribe a female than a male. Approximately fifty percent more females are using Xanax than males.

The Dependency on Xanax by Individuals with a Mental Condition

One of the most significant factors for prescription trends is age. According to a report in 2008, just 2.6 percent of individuals between the ages of eighteen and 35 were taking benzodiazepines. The report also showed 8.7 percent of individuals between 65 and eighty were using this drug. There is no way to be certain if the physician is more likely to prescribe if the individual is older or if this generation has better access to healthcare. These individuals may seek treatment more often. Xanax is prescribed for individuals who have a mental illness to treat their symptoms. Some of these people abuse Xanax for self-medication. Unfortunately, this abuse can cause their condition to become much worse.

According to the Mental Illness National Alliance, approximately fifty percent of the individuals with a severe mental disorder have a problem with substance abuse. This issue is relatively standard. If the individual is using Xanax too often or in large amounts, they are more likely to become dependent on the drug. Even if the individual has a prescription with a recommended dose, they can develop an addiction to Xanax. Individuals abusing poly-drugs have an increased risk of becoming addicted to drugs like Xanax because they make the effects of other substances more intense. When Xanax and alcohol are combined, the risk of death or severe injury is substantially increased. According to the results of studies, as many as 41 percent of individuals abusing benzodiazepines are also fighting alcoholism.