Dangers of Snorting Adderall

Dangers of Snorting Adderall

Adderall Drug Classification

Adderall is one of the most common prescription central nervous system stimulants. Doctors prescribe Adderall and other stimulants to patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and narcolepsy. 

People with these conditions, and a limited number of others, have benefited greatly from the prescription use of Adderall. But despite these proven medical uses, Adderall is still considered a high-risk prescription. It comes with a high risk of abuse and addiction. 

Misuse of prescription stimulants has become a serious problem in the United States. This is particularly true on high school and college campuses across the country. Individuals in these age groups are vulnerable to drug and alcohol abuse and addiction because their brains have not fully developed yet. 

Medical vs. Nonmedical Adderall Use 

When used medically, Adderall can help regulate important brain functions, including attention, focus, and energy. These side effects make the drug beneficial for those who have conditions that affect attention and energy levels, including ADHD. 

But they are also what makes Adderall appealing to teenagers and young adults who do not necessarily need it. Adderall has been nicknamed “the study drug,” because many students use it to cram during exam weeks. 

Despite its medical use in boosting attention and increasing productivity, there is no evidence that Adderall improves test scores when used nonmedically. One notable study revealed that students who misused Adderall scored lower grade point averages than those who didn’t use Adderall. 

And what starts in the teen or young adult years often follows us into adulthood. The majority of those who have a substance use disorder started using before age 18 and developed their disorder by age 20.  

Adderall should only be taken by the individual it is prescribed to. And it should only be taken in the ways outlined by your doctor. Otherwise, troublesome side effects, addictions, and withdrawal symptoms become more likely. 

Side Effects of Adderall

Most individuals who misuse Adderall do so to boost their focus or energy. But these are not the side effects that last when you take Adderall nonmedically. Repeated misuse of prescription stimulants, even in a short amount of time, can cause psychosis, anger, or paranoia. 

In high doses, they can cause dangerously high body temperatures, irregular heartbeats, heart failure, and seizures. In teenagers and young adults, there are additional side effects that we should be aware of. 

Impaired memory, inability to think clearly, and potentially long-term mental health problems are all possible. Additionally, misusing Adderall in certain ways can increase the likelihood of overdosing. 

An Adderall overdose can cause a wide range of troubling health symptoms, including tremors, rapid breathing, confusion, hallucination, panic, fevers, and muscle weakness. One of the riskiest methods of misusing Adderall is snorting it rather than taking it orally. 

Why Do People Snort Adderall?

When taken as instructed, it takes about 30 minutes to one hour for Adderall to kick in. But how long does Adderall take to kick in when snorted? Adderall acts much more quickly when snorted, which is why people who use Adderall nonmedically often take it this way. 

Rather than an onset of side effects after 30 to 60 minutes, snorting Adderall causes the effects to kick in almost immediately. 

Is Snorting Adderall Bad for You? 

Is Snorting Adderall Bad for You

This type of ingestion bypasses our body’s natural defense systems, making it one of the most dangerous forms of substance abuse. It can impact your body and brain in a wide variety of unpleasant, painful, or even life-threatening ways. 

The mental and physical health impairments associated with snorting Adderall range from mild to severe and can be life-threatening. On the milder side, things like insomnia may prove to be irritating but otherwise relatively harmless. 

But on the more severe side of things, there are potential cardiovascular and central nervous system issues that can cause long-term health impairments. For some, they have even proven fatal. Medical professionals urge strongly against snorting anything that is not meant to be snorted, including Adderall.  

Physical Effects of Snorting Adderall 

Rather than the gradual onset of side effects that comes with appropriate Adderall ingestion, snorting it causes more of an intense rush. The risk of addiction, overdose, and other mental and physical health complications is much higher when the drug is misused this way. 

Some of the most common physical effects of snorting Adderall include cardiovascular issues (rapid heartbeats and palpitations), impaired sleep cycles (trouble falling asleep or staying asleep), and central nervous system issues (dizziness, vomiting, and headaches.) 

The longer the abuse goes on and the higher the doses become, the more likely overdoses and withdrawal symptoms are. And these physical symptoms are only half of the equation. 

Mental Effects of Snorting Adderall

In addition to the physical effects of snorting Adderall listed above, snorting Adderall can take its toll mentally, too. Sudden and uncontrollable mood swings are common and often include several different unpleasant changes.  

Nervousness, anxiety, agitation, irritability, confusion, depression, and restlessness have all been reported by individuals abusing Adderall. Snorting large doses can cause irrational bouts of paranoia or aggression. 

Use, Abuse, and Addiction: Adderall as a Gateway Drug

Taking Adderall the way it is intended can be beneficial. Its effects typically remain mild, and the abuse potential remains lower than it is when taken for nonmedical purposes. But the problem with this popular prescription medication is that it is easy to access and abuse. 

Someone who takes a pill from a friend once or twice to help them study may find that they don’t want to stop. The longer the abuse goes on, the more likely addiction becomes. And when we become addicted to a substance, withdrawal symptoms often keep us coming back for more. On top of this, there’s growing anecdotal (as well as clinical) evidence of the potential for Adderall to become a ‘gateway drug’ for further substance abuse, particularly involving methamphetamine addiction.   

Adderall Withdrawal Symptoms 

Adderall Withdrawal Symptoms

Have you ever tried to stop taking a drug or drinking alcohol and experienced overwhelming cravings for it, headaches, mood swings, or other unpleasant mental or physical symptoms? These are what we call withdrawal symptoms

When you misuse something for long enough, your body becomes accustomed to it. Physical dependence on the substance develops, and you will begin to feel as if you need more of it to operate normally. 

You may also feel as if you need larger or more frequent doses to achieve the desired effects. At this point, it can be difficult to quit cold turkey. Withdrawal symptoms, particularly cravings, often trick us into thinking we need more. 

Some of the most common Adderall withdrawal symptoms include cravings, anxiety, exhaustion, and severe depression. These withdrawal symptoms can feel overwhelming and trick you into believing that there is no other way. 

But we’re here to remind you that there is. A better and healthier life is possible. And we are here to help you achieve it. With convenient, flexible, and customizable care programs, we will meet you where you are in your journey toward recovery and guide you the rest of the way. 

Treatment for Adderall Abuse

If you or someone you love has been snorting Adderall, don’t wait another day to ask for help. From detox to aftercare, we offer high-level and compassionate addiction treatments in a safe, comfortable, and supportive environment. 

We have helped thousands of people all over the country reach and maintain long-term recovery from addiction. Call us today at 818-452-1676. We are here to help you rediscover your life. 

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