Going to Rehab

How to Mentally Prepare Yourself for Going to Rehab

According to the Centers for Disease Control, over 130 people die from an opioid overdose every day. 

As challenging as drug rehabilitation seems, it’s a far better option than death. With the right care, you can get the most out of the experience and achieve your full potential.

Here are 10 ways to mentally prepare yourself before going to rehab.

With this list, you can prepare for rehab beforehand and get the most out of the experience. You’ve got this!

1. Take Care of Work Obligations

It’s understandable that you might feel embarrassed about mentioning your rehabilitation stay with an employer. However, being open about needing help and demonstrating your willingness to improve yourself is an important step.

Let your employer know you plan on leaving for rehab. The sooner you let them know, the sooner you and your employer can plan a course of action.

That way, someone keeps up with your job responsibilities during your absence.

Remember, you’re trying to improve yourself to live a happier, healthier life. If your employer appreciates you, they’ll want you to get better.

The Family and Medical Leave Act also guarantees your job is protected during your drug rehab stay.

Using the 12 weeks of medical leave you’re provided under this act, you can focus on getting better instead of stressing about your career.

2. Discuss It with Family

According to this national survey, 90 percent of the people who require drug rehab never get the help they need.

There are a number of reasons people don’t prioritize getting help. For parents, it can be difficult to leave their children for an extended period of time.

Be open and honest with family members and loved ones.

That way, they can help and support you. Having a plan in place can also relieve any mental burdens you have about leaving family during this time. 

This tip goes for any pets, too! If you have a pet at home, make sure they’re placed in temporary care with a family member or loved one while you’re in drug rehabilitation. 

3. Assess Financial or Legal Issues

Don’t stress about the bills while you’re in rehab. After all, that time is reserved for improving your mental and physical wellbeing.

If you’re planning on going to rehab, set up automated payments for your bills instead.

You can also speak to a trusted love one about handling your finances for you. That way, you can return after your drug rehabilitation without the burden of financial stress slowing you down. 

If needed, let the courts or your attorney know about your rehab stay beforehand as well. 

4. Start Journaling

Remember, part of rehab is about improving your mental and physical wellbeing. By adding a journal as part of your rehab preparation, you can mentally “check in” with yourself throughout the process.

Keeping a journey can help you determine your mindset and goals before going to rehab.

Whether you develop a checklist or journal out your thoughts and feelings, daily journaling is a therapeutic exercise. You can also maintain this habit after your drug rehabilitation as a way of continuing your treatment at home. 

Discover the mental and physical challenges you might face during your recovery as part of your rehab preparation. 

5. Stay Open-minded

Signing up for and going to rehab can feel like a defeat, but it’s not. Asking for help and recognizing you have a problem are both important steps to your recovery.

As you prepare for rehab, keep an open mind.

Remind yourself that the process is designed to help you live a happier, healthier life in the future. If you’re closed off to the process and don’t believe it can help, you’re also closing yourself off to your recovery.

Instead, embrace the process of rehabilitation and remind yourself of all you have to gain from your stay.

6. Take Only the Essentials

Despite the emotional comfort some items can provide, rehabilitation centers have their own list of permitted items you can bring with you. 

Stuffing your bag with mementos can actually lead to distractions. Instead of packing heavy, stick to the recommended list. Remember, everything will be there when you get back home. 

That way, you can minimize distractions and focus on your recovery instead.  

7. Speak Up

Before going to rehab, consider how addiction has impacted your life. As part of your rehabilitation center prep, determine the areas of your life you want to improve.

Speak up about these areas for potential improvement with families, friends, and professionals at the rehab center.

This will keep you focused throughout your rehabilitation, so you can accomplish these goals. It will also help your support team determine how they can best help you after your recovery.

8. Be Patient

Rehabilitation doesn’t happen overnight. Before going to rehab, remind yourself to be patient. 

Everyone recovers in their own time. Just focus on being present in every moment of your rehabilitation, and keep that open mind. That way, you can focus on the experience and reap the many positive benefits of rehab.

9. Relax

Rehabilitation will help you take care of your mind and body. While it might feel natural to stress out about the unknown, learning how to relax and calm your mind can help support your recovery.

Take up meditation or yoga, even before starting rehab. This can help you learn how to ground yourself. That way, you can use the same methods during your drug rehabilitation. 

10. Remind Yourself

Before going to rehab, remind yourself why you signed up in the first place. Drug addiction can impact the people you care about most. It can also hurt your career, your body, and your future.

Remind yourself why you decided to go to rehab and keep your goals in mind. 

That way, you can stay focused on the future ahead. 

10 Ways to Mentally Prepare Before Going to Rehab

With these 10 methods, you can prepare yourself before going to rehab. That way, you can make the most of the experience and come out stronger than ever.

Live your life to its full potential. 

Discover our programs and take your life back today.

About the Reviewer: Chris Barnes

Chris BarnesChristopher Barnes has worked in health care for over thirty years. He is a graduate of Alabama State University where he earned a double Bachelor of Science Degree in Social Work and Psychology in 1982. Christopher Barnes is currently the Director of Clinical services at The Discovery House where he has been employed for the past five years. Because of his extensive experience in health care & substance abuse he has an excellent rapport with constituents, clients, and other professional organizations in the counseling/social service community.