i need rehab

“Do I Need Rehab?” Here Are 5 Eye-Opening Signs It’s Time for Professional Help

According to this survey, 19.7 million American adults battled addiction in 2017. Many people, however, find it difficult to recognize they even have a problem.

Instead of avoiding the issue, you can tackle it head on and take back control over your life. That way, you can get your life back on track for a brighter future.

Admitting to yourself “I need rehab” is a great first step! Here are five eye-opening signs it’s time to consider professional help. 

1. My Friends and Family Are Concerned

If friends and family have asked you to stop drinking or using drugs, chances are you have a problem. Addiction can impact relationships, even causing rifts that can’t be repaired. 

If you’re pushing friends and family away, consider why. Look back and consider whether you’ve lied about your addiction.

Often enough, our friends and family members are the first to notice a problem. Try to see the situation from their point of view.

They may have noticed you exhibit other signs that it’s time you check into rehab. Our own reckless behavior and choices are easier to see from an outside perspective. 

As you consider their point of view, also consider the stress and worry your addiction has caused them. Addiction doesn’t just impact users, but the people around you as well. 

Hiding alcoholism or drug use from friends and family is another sign it’s time for help. 

Instead of pushing away people who care about you most, let them help. Lean on them for support, especially when you’re checking into rehab.

This can make the process a lot easier and help ease not only their concerns, but your own. 

2. I Experience Withdrawal Symptoms

Have you tried to quit on your own? Maybe you don’t know how to stop, or can’t manage to stop for long periods of time on your own. 

Withdrawal symptoms can make quitting alone a painful, tedious process. Without professionals there to guide you and offer support, it becomes harder to quit alone. 

These withdrawal symptoms can include nausea, cramps, and headaches. You might also experience paranoia and insomnia.

Instead of letting these symptoms halt your recovery, get help and learn how to fight back. The right tools and methods can make coping with withdrawal symptoms much easier. 

It’s possible that you’ve developed a tolerance over time. This can make it more difficult for you to quit on your own. 

Rehab won’t just help you battle these withdrawal symptoms. It will also teach you the techniques to maintain your sobriety in the future.  

If you’re telling yourself “I need rehab,” you’re also recognizing that someone out there can help. Instead of relying on your own means, lean toward friends, family, and professionals. 

3. I’ve Driven a Car While Under the Influence

Why did you ask yourself “do I need rehab” in the first place? If you’ve noticed changes in your own behavior, it’s probably time for help.

Reckless, dangerous choices are signs you should consider checking into rehab. This can include driving while intoxicated or high.

While it might not seem like a bad idea at the time, reckless driving can lead to moments you can’t take back. Don’t put yourself in the position where your inhibitions are stripped down. 

Addiction causes a lack of control and responsibility. Your ability to make smart, logical choices is diminished.

Don’t forget, there are other consequences to addiction, including an arrest for driving under the influence. You could also find yourself behind bars due to possession.

Instead of choosing addiction, chose recovery. Avoid an accident or jail time before it happens. 

Even if you’ve managed to avoid an accident in the past, that doesn’t mean it won’t happen. Reckless behavior only increases with each risk. Don’t wait until a fatal accident to ask for help. 

4. My Doctor Has Pointed out Health Issues

Drugs and alcohol cause numerous strains on your body over time.

Liver damage isn’t the only risk of alcoholism. It can also cause damage to the brain and heart as well. 

Meanwhile, drugs can cause issues with the brain, lungs, and blood.

If you’re asking yourself “do I need rehab,” check in with your body. Recognize how you feel now, versus how you felt before your addiction began.

With rehab, you can stop before putting your body through irreparable damage. If you continue with your addiction, however, this damage will only get worse after time. 

Don’t let addiction ruin the only body you have. With help, you discover a happier, healthier life. We can even develop a treatment and nutrition program with you.

As a result, you can avoid major health issues and develop healthy habits for a brighter future.

5. Addiction Is Impacting My Life

According to this report, 19.3 million people need rehab but don’t receive it. 

Don’t waste timing wondering “should I go to rehab?” Instead, take action before drug use can impact your entire life. In addition to causing a strain on relationships and your health, addiction can also hurt your future.

If you’ve lost your job or dropped out of school, chances are you need to tell yourself “I need rehab.”

Addiction can cause us to neglect our responsibilities. Instead, we spend all our time and energy trying to get more.

This can also cause financial issues. Many of us have worked hard building a career and planning a future. Addiction can eat away at that future—and your savings.

If you feel like you’ve lost control of your life, look into rehab. Remember, your addiction can get worse. And if drug or alcohol use hasn’t impacted your life yet, it’s only a matter of time before it does.

Do I Need Rehab: 5 Signs You Do

Take a look at your life: your relationships, health, finances, and future. Drug and alcohol use can strip that all away.

Instead of letting addiction control your life, ask yourself “do I need rehab?”. Look for these five signs it’s time for help and consider taking the next step. 

Once you recognize these signs and move forward with rehabilitation, you can take control again. Consider checking into rehab before it’s too late.

Check our recovery blog for more help!

About the Reviewer: Chris Barnes

Chris BarnesChristopher Barnes has worked in health care for over thirty years. He is a graduate of Alabama State University where he earned a double Bachelor of Science Degree in Social Work and Psychology in 1982. Christopher Barnes is currently the Director of Clinical services at The Discovery House where he has been employed for the past five years. Because of his extensive experience in health care & substance abuse he has an excellent rapport with constituents, clients, and other professional organizations in the counseling/social service community.